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Hot Turkey Sandwich




To me, nothing says comfort food like turkey. Turkey with potatoes, cold turkey sandwiches, hot turkey sandwiches, you get the point.

Normally, I roast a turkey breast with a bacon weave. This self-basts the bird and makes it very moist. The downside is you are left with more bacon grease than turkey drippings, which doesn't make the best gravy.

 For sandwiches, I go a more traditional route. Begin by chopping vegetables for the gravy base. I use three sticks of celery, two large carrots, a small sweet onion, a clove of garlic, and a teaspoon of parsley. Add the veggies to the bottom of a roasting pan, then add two cups of chicken broth.

Now to prepare the turkey breast. Rinse the breast well and pat dry. Place on a roasting rack and brush with melted butter. Lightly season with herbs de provence.
Use the spices sparingly, they can be quite strong.

Bast the turkey about every 30 to 45 minutes with melted butter. After about two hours, check for browning. When the breast is golden brown, tent with aluminum foil until done.


When the internal temperature reaches 165 degrees, remove from the oven and let rest for half an hour.


 Strain the juice in the bottom of the roasting pan and let cool. Add five tablespoons flour to the juice, making a thick roux, then add two cups of chicken broth.


 Heat until thickened. I like my gravy a little on the thin side, that way it thickens when refrigerated and doesn't need thinning later. For a darker gravy some folks add caramel coloring, but I prefer a little squirt of Worcestershire sauce.

Slice the breasts clean from the bone, then into 1/2 inch thick pieces.





Place several slices of turkey on a slice of white bread and cover with gravy.





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