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Roasting Hatch Green Chiles


My brother is often an inspiration for my recipes. Years ago he lived in New Mexico. It was there that he discovered Hatch chilies. Grown in the Hatch valley, these peppers are well know in the southwest as being a flavorful treat. Outside most major retailers in the Southwest, are roasters with large drums, where your just bought peppers will be tumbled until blistered. This helps with the removal of the peels.

One of our local stores had peppers two years ago, and I was able to purchase three peppers. These were roasted in the toaster oven, diced, then put on burgers and hot dogs. We were hooked, and anxiously awaited the arrival of peppers last year. Unfortunately, there were no peppers available locally.

Fast forward to this year, and I got lucky. Walked into the market, and there in front of me were these green beauties. They had about 8 pounds of mild; I only took 7. They also had a nice selection of hot, and I got about 1 1/2 pounds.

Now for the preparation, wash and dry the peppers.




Heat your grill to about 450 degrees.
Place the peppers on the grates of the grill for 3 to 5 minutes until the skins begin to blister.




Carefully use your tongs and turn the peppers over, roasting both sides.






When the peppers are about three quarters blistered, remove and place in a zip top bag, and allow to steam for 10 to 15 minutes.

Handle carefully, they will be very hot.
If the chilies are still to hot to touch after 15 minutes, dunk them in an ice water bath.

The skin should very easy to peel, but you should wear gloves, especially  if you are peeling a lot. Your hands could start burning if the peppers are the hot variety.


I kept about about two dozen whole; these will be used to make New Mexican-style chili rellenos following the traditional Mexican technique of being stuffed, then covered with batter and fried. 

The rest have been diced and frozen in 1/4 cup bags for recipes down the road.


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